Why should you bother learning rules when you can use a grammar checker?

Does editing your posts take a lot of time? Do you think using an online grammar checker would save you time? Is it worth it to do the editing yourself?

No, you should not use an online grammar check to replace editing your blog posts yourself. First, it’s lazy. Second, professionals learn the rules of their profession, and this goes for online writers.

If you are writing a professional blog, you need to learn how to write a blog that is error-free. This is especially true if your blog is monetized and your goal is to make a living at it.

Grammar checker

If your goal is to make money from your blog, you need to learn how to write a blog that is error-free.

Grammar checkers can catch superficial spelling or grammar errors. The problem is that they don’t often catch transparent errors or awkward writing. I tried the online grammar checker at reverso.net on a few errors I’ve seen lately, and there were several things it didn’t catch. I found these examples online at various blogs.

Example 1: A pretty question about affiliate links is how to mask affiliate links that is safe in Google’s eye.

Grammar checker’s correction: It didn’t detect any mistakes.

My analysis: There is an agreement error in the second part of the sentence: “how to mask affiliate links that is safe in Google’s eye.” The verb is refers back to links, which is plural. The phrase should be: “how to mask affiliate links that are safe in Google’s eye.”

Example 2: “We all know that it is important that we have a blog…BUT…It’s also very important that you have YOUR OWN Blog for your business and not just on that is provided by your company.”

Grammar checker’s correction: It didn’t detect any mistakes.

My analysis: I see five errors in that sentence. The ellipses are misused twice. A comma should go before but, and no punctuation after. It’s and blog are also capitalized when they don’t need to be. The phrase “not just on” should be “not just one.”

I would also tell this author to take the all caps of BUT and YOUR OWN out, and to unbold “YOUR OWN Blog.” They are unnecessary.

Example 3: The main customer of the search engines are the people looking for information, bloggers and content creators are not their ideal clients.

Grammar checker’s correction: The main customer of the search engines is the people looking for information, bloggers and content creators are not their ideal clients.

My analysis: The grammar checker detected the agreement error between customer (singular) and are (plural), but there is still a problem with the switch from singular customer to plural people. And the grammar checker did not pick up on the fact that the original example is a run-on sentence. Two complete thoughts are crammed together. The sentence should be broken between information and bloggers.

To correct all of the problems in this example, it should be written like this: The main customers of the search engines are the people looking for information. Bloggers and content creators are not their ideal clients.

I hope the above examples give you an idea of why it pays to be smarter than a computerized grammar checker. A human, especially one who is good at editing and making judgment calls that a computer cannot, is essential to the editing process.

If you want to be taken seriously as a professional blogger, don’t skip or automate the editing process. It is as much a part of the writing process as the writing is. Blog writers who skip or try to computerize the editing process are doing themselves and their readers a disservice.

If you’re not good at editing yourself, have a human who is good at it proofread your posts.

Readers, what do you think of grammar checkers? How much time do you spend editing your blog posts?

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